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MFG 19 Sailboat

Posted by Kevin Adkins 
MFG 19 Sailboat
Juli 15, 2008 09:52
I have just purchased a 1977 MFG 19 which I need some advice on regarding some of its atributes. I have never owned a sailboat before and am
unsure of some of its charecteristics. If anyone is famaliar with this boat, please feel free to contact me and maybe help answer some of my questions. I appreciate it greatly. My e-mail is kadkins@hvac-inc.com.

thanks,

Kevin Adkins
Erwin, Tn.
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
Juli 19, 2008 09:42
Kevin, there are a number of people watching this forum regularly who own MFG 19s, me included. There is also some good information in the MFG 19 section of this website. Feel free to ask any questions here (also search for other MFG 19 posts) and I am sure you will get help.

Paul
Webmaster: sailmfg.com
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
Juli 21, 2008 04:09
To all MFG 19 Owners:

I'm glad to see so many MFG19's back in the water or in the process of being restored. Believe me, it is well worth the time and effort. Many posters have asked about various amenities on the 19 (sinks, head liner,etc) and it seems that many previous owners have added and subtracted from the original stock boat. If you go back to the homepage and click on the logo you can access the parts list. There is no mention of a headliner(I don't have one and there is no evidence of it ever having one) but that doesn't mean some models didn't have it. A sink was never part of the original equipment, but some owners added them as well as a through the hull drain out the transom. All models came with steps from the cockpit to the cabin, but pictures I've seen of some boats have no steps. Also, all MFG19's came with the mainsail, jib and a genoa as standard equipment. The parts list said that the cushions were optional, but everyone I talk to has the originals or copies of the originals. Anyway, check the parts list and see what you should have. This a great little boat that will really move and is easy to sail. After the lousy weather of June, July has become a sailor's delight here in Ohio. I've been on the water a number of times in the past few weeks. Good sailing to you all!

Dick
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
August 14, 2008 04:10
I just purchased a 1978 MFG 19 and have a million questions?
How do you know the year of the boat other than the registration.
The headliner of this boat has been removed, any options other than paint.
Used sails?
Owners manual?
What type or brand of paint for below water part of the boat.

Thanks
Harvey
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
August 20, 2008 04:57
Dick,

Can you give me a contact for new or used sails. The MFG 19 I purchased was to include them but I haven't seen them yet.
There are many on the net but a recomendation would make me a little more comfortable.

Thanks,
Harvey
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
August 21, 2008 04:08
Harvey:

Welcome to the club! Regarding sails - I would try either The Sail Warehouse (www.thesailwarehouse.com) or Sail Care(www.sailcare.com). You can also try North Sails but I would surmise that they are rather pricy. In reference to your other questions: 1) you should be able to find the year of manufacture in the Hull Identification Number located on the transom; 2) the headliner issue has come up on numerous occasions without any resolution. I don't have a headliner. My cabin ceiling is painted white. Unless your through the deck fittings are REALLY well seated, you will get some seepage which would stain your headliner. 3) For an owners manual see the MFG19 logo on the home page. Paul has posted rigging instructions, a parts list and a brief description of the boat and it's characteristics. 4) For a bottom coat I use West Marine anti-fouling paint every other year. Be sure to power wash well before application and possibly sand if necessary. Feel free to post any other questions. I'm glad to offer what ever info I can provide.

Dick
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
September 02, 2008 02:53
Dick,

Thanks for the info. The sails arrived on friday the 22nd, the main is an original I think. It has the 19 emblem at the top and 103 in red for a number. We finally got it on Lake Ontario on thursday. My wife and I have never sailed anything other than a kite so it was quite an experience. I would still be rigging the boat if not for the rigging instructions on this site. Friday went better. Saturday went great, we sailed 10 miles from Westcott Beach State Park to
Association Island on to Henderson Harbor and back, I used the jib sail on Saturday even though it isn't very pretty, a few holes and stains. My GPS registered about 4MPH, is this typical? Thanks Again!

Harvey
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
September 03, 2008 08:15
Harvey:
Not knowing your windspeed and direction, I would say that your GPS was fairly accurate. You can expect more speed as you become more experienced and comfortable with your boat. Glad I could help with the sail issue. Who did you finally order from? It is 2:15 PM here in central Ohio. Temp is 87 and the wind is out of the NW at 7-10 MPH. I'm heading to the boat!!! Good sailing!

Dick
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
September 04, 2008 02:54
Dick,

Sorry that I confused you, the sails are the originals that came with the boat. The person I bought the boat from said they were included in the sale if he could locate them and he came through. Does the number 103 have any reference to the date the boat was produced?

Thanks Again,
Harvey
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
Oktober 03, 2008 09:34
Sorry this is coming late… I also bought an MFG-19 this year and have had a blast with it.

If you are looking for specific handling characteristics:
It has a top speed of just under 6 knots.
It can run fairly high up into the wind, but in heavy wind may be limited because of the high freeboard (height above water line). I find that if the wind is up around 15-20 knots I am better off jibing rather than trying to tack.
Reaching across the wind, it heels over easily to about 40 degrees, but does not go far beyond that. If you try to be gutsy and hold it heeled over in heavy wind, it heels until the rudder comes clear of the waves, then loses steering and swings up into the wind. I have never knocked it over. That’s not saying you couldn’t, but I have done a number of things as I relearned some old skills that should have if it was going to.
The Boat’s angle of vanishing stability (using the correct formula) is about 102 degrees. 90 degrees would put your sail parallel to the water surface. The wind starts to dump off the sails at about 40 degrees and diminishes to near nothing at about 75 degrees. In other words, any weather you have any business being out in, should not capsize the boat.
The boat is a great teacher and very forgiving. It is also very relaxing. Prop a boat cushion on the transom, drape your arm on the tiller and let the boat do its thing… If you are having to fight the tiller…. Make sure it is all the way down.
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
Oktober 04, 2008 03:56
Christopher,

Welcome to the website! Your report here is very enlightening.

I have a couple of questions about your boat. Any other owners can feel free to chime in as well. I'm trying to figure out some of the differences in the factory options.

One MFG19 I have seen has wooden rails, made of teak. on it. Mine does not. How about yours?

Likewise, the other MFG19 I saw has long battens in the sail. Mine has short ones. How about yours?

I also know the motor mount was different (the other one looking a bit sturdier).

Finally, a last question totally unrelated: when your boat sits in the water, is the point at the very bottom of the stern directly at the water line, slightly below it, or slightly above it? If not directly at the water line, right how much is it above or below?

Paul
Webmaster: sailmfg.com
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
Oktober 05, 2008 03:25
I have a grab rail down the center top of the cabin deck. That looks like oak at least by grain and stain.
The side rails are metal post and cable. There are no wooden cockpit rails.

My battens are short. They can remain in their pocket and still get the sail into its back easily.

The lower marroon stripe (on my boat) very precisely marks the water line of the "naked" boat, with minimal gear, no people and no motor.
For the most part the lower quarter inch of the stripe is covered in still water. With the motor, 2 people and a lunch, the lower 1/2 of the stripe is covered and the stern sits lower, unless one of us stands forward of the mast. Then the stern sits up out of the water.
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
Oktober 06, 2008 08:25
Paul and Christopher,

Nice to hear of your adventures with your MFG-19s. We have had a lot of fun this summer even though we got a late start. I replaced the wood by the mast with Oak. But I have seen pictues with wood on both sides. I would like to purchase a Genoa sail but I'm not sure how close the measurements need to be. My jib has a cable and snaps, what other attachments will work. I also wonder if I am tightening my mast cables enough, at times will sailing the cables on the side of the the main sail appear loose.

Thanks,
Harvey
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
Oktober 07, 2008 12:49
Christopher, Thanks for the info. Please do me a favor if you can: measure the battons. My boat did not come with any so I need to have some made. It would help if I had real dimensions.

That is interesting that you have wood on your boat. I do not.

Harvey: I too would like to get a Genoa. I would not think the measurements need to be critical. We know that one was available, so the rigging can handle the extra load. If you end up getting one made, please let me know how it works out and where you get it. I don't think Dick Henry is active any longer in this forum, which is a real loss. But, in case he is, he can tell us because he has a Genoa.

As for the rigging... you are describing a loose rigging. Some boats like the rigging a bit loose. I don't know about the MFG 19. All the rigging directions say are to "tighten the wires snug". Perhaps Christopher can tell us how his is.

Paul
Webmaster: sailmfg.com
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
Oktober 08, 2008 04:02
Paul, Christopher and Harvey:

You guys have way too many questions! First of all, go to the SailMFG website, click on "brochures", click on "1979" and then click on the middle picture where you will find the MFG19 with all its specs. The Genoa is 115, the jib is 70 and the main is 85. Also, if you look at the parts list under the 19 logo you will see that part #861112 under standard equipment is a genoa. Part #861195 is listed as a batten set. If you don't have batten pockets on your main then it is either a later model or an aftermarket sail. You might check sailwarehouse or Sail Care. Battens can be purchased through WestMarine or Defender in various lengths and can be cut to fit and they are not very expense. When I haul my boat in three weeks I will gladly measure the sails and the battens and post those measurements.

In terms of the wood, again I would suggest that you look at the pictures under brochures and the ones posted under the 19 logo. Any wood on the sides of the deck, in the cockpit and/or in the cabin are "add ons". We all add things to our boats to suit our personalities and our perceived needs. I have wood handrails on each side of my deck which were added by the previous owner. They work for me and help with hanging fenders, attaching a lifeline, etc. As they say " whatever floats your boat!"

Finally (at least for now), the tension on your fore and aft stays and shrouds should be very snug. For only about $70 you can buy a Loos Guage to measure the tension and make sure it is equal all around. It is a worthwhile investment. I also suggest removing the standing rigging when you haul out your boat each year and store in a dry location.

By the way, in the 5 years I've had my boat I've used the genoa only twice. I've not been able to be out on the water much since mid-August due to a very ill relative who passed away last week. Paul, take my boat off the" for sale "list. I think I'll keep her for a while longer.

Good sailing to you all!

Dick
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
Oktober 08, 2008 04:20
OK, Dick, I'll remove the ad. Glad to hear it. Thanks for the info!

Paul
Webmaster: sailmfg.com
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
Oktober 09, 2008 05:34
The stays should be evenly tight (no slack at all) when the mast is stepped, but no sails. The Loos guage is a good idea (though I don't have one). For a small boat it is not critical... there should not be enough power in the sails to snap the rigging.

When the boat is under sail, particullarly on a reach, the sails will create a bit of slack on the lee side. As you tack or jibe then the mast snaps suddenly against the slackened stays. That is when you can shatter shackles and snap cables.

I will measure my battons and my genny. I have used the genoa a lot. It has metal clips for the forestay and is a bit easier to mount than the standard Jib. It improves the performance in light winds. Once you get up around 10 knots for breeze, the advantage of the genny is limited by the hull speed and the standard jib gives more control.

I will try to get some pictures as we pull the boat this weekend, so all can see the configuration.
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
Oktober 21, 2008 12:36
Paul, Christopher and Harvey:

Although I haven't yet hauled the boat for the season, I did remove the sails in preparation for a Thursday pull-out. I had 2 excellent sails over the weekend. Saturday's winds were out of the northeast at 12-15. Sunday was a little more tame at 6-8. Temperatures on both bays were in the low 60's so it was rather brisk. With the sails off I was able to take some measurements for you. The genoa measures 23' up the luff, 21' down the leech and 10' across the foot. I also have a light air headsail which is basically the same size as the jib, but is made of a material much the same texture and weight of a parachute. It works very well in extremely light air. As for the battens in the main, the top batten measures 301/2", the middle is 53" and the bottom goes at 691/2". I hope these measurements help those of you who are in need.

Dick
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
Oktober 23, 2008 06:30
My top batten is 20 inches long and 9/16 inch wide.
The mid batten is 26 inches long and the bottom is 26 ½ inches
My genoa is slightly larger in all dimensions (about 2 square feet more area)
This probably indicates some variability in suppliers.
Also highlights that precision is not needed.
The battens certainly should be made or purchased to fit the batten pocket on the sail.
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
November 24, 2008 12:27
Kevin when you put the mast up did you put it up from from the front of the boat or back. I followed the direction Paul had and haven't had any problems. I haven't seen anyone else go from the front of the boat to put the mast up, most seem to go from the back up.
Re: MFG 19 Sailboat
November 27, 2008 11:29
TRJLF:

This may or may not provide you any help, but I thought I'd chime in on this topic. I've tried several different ways of stepping the mast but this is what works best for me: first, attach your standing rigging (aft stay, shrouds and side stays) to their chain plates. Then slide the mast back until you can put the aft pin into the mast foot. I then use my jib sheets and attach the snap shackle to the the clevis pin of the fore stay. With someone steadying the mast on the deck, I use the jib sheets to lift the mast in to place and insert the fore pin into the foot. With that person holding the mast, the forestay can then be attached to the foreward chainplate. I tighten the turnbuckles all the way around before putting on the boom and the main sail. I use a Loos guage to make sure the tension is the same on all the stays. Some sailers use winches and/or blocks attached to their trailers with a sturdy rope instead of the jib sheets. We have a very helpful group of sailers at our little marina who help each other step and drop masts as well as launch and haul out each year. I hope this is of some assistance to you.

Dick
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